It’s Not You, It’s Me – Saying Goodbye to a Book that Wasn’t Right for You

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Most of us can relate to having had an awkward breakup in our life and those lucky enough not to will be able to when I compare it to books you began reading but have lost interest in. There are two options here; keep reading and hope it gets better like it was when you first began or… come to realise that it isn’t what you are looking for and break its paper heart by ending it there and then. Unfortunately I’m the first option type of guy. Call it deluding oneself or arrogance but I force myself to finish a book I have started – this had led me to reluctantly reading Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse 5 (too weird for me) and Stroud’s The Amulet of Samarkand (just didn’t capture my interest). But is that a bad thing? Aren’t parents always telling us to try new things?

After all there are books that I am glad I have read which I perhaps did not enjoy at the time. One such example is Dante’s Inferno which I can guarantee is not a book for the inattentive. Dante’s classic needs complete attention at all times due to the lack of poetic rhythm lost in its interpretation. However, the one thought I had that helped me finish it was the overall sense of accomplishment in doing so. That and the thought about being able to name drop it at dinner parties with a glass of red wine in one hand (something I have now done). Moreover, some books, like a fine wine, do get better with time. For me, Wong’s John Dies at the End is a perfect example of this. Originally I found it to rely too much on the bizarre, leaving little room for any such narrative however, by a quarter of the way through I found myself finding difficult to put down; I was hooked. The book just needed some time to establish the character in order to guide the reader into the uncanny.

It is official, some books just aren’t suited for me but, like an ex, I know that they are perfect for someone else out there. The truth of the matter is that one should never be ashamed to admit defeat on a book nor give up to easily (all relationships require a little work even ones with books). However, next time you have an awkward moment when you see that book lying on your shelf, taunting you with the fact that it beat you, keep smiling. You gave it a go and there’s no shame in that. Pick up that book and hand it to a friend, a family member, a charity shop or a complete stranger, who knows, it might just be the right book for them.

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