Fall of the House of Blusher – The Truth Behind Wearing Make-Up

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Foundation, lipstick, eye liner, mascara; the products found in any make-up bag. The question is why? Why are they essentials? We all know of one Oompa-Loompa lookalike who went a little over the top with the bronzer in high school so we already know that too much is just as bad as too little but in reality is there such a thing as too little?

Women are constantly bombarded by adverts, models, newspapers and all other media platforms that they must always wear make-up when leaving the house. Even business women are portrayed as wearing lipstick and mascara implying that make-up leads to success. I can officially say that if an employer is more interested in the products meticulously applied to one’s face then I would not want to work for them. The conformity to what is seen as beautiful should not be what people are hired for because no matter what way you look at it, women would still be objectified by it.

Of course it isn’t a matter of equality exactly. There are products for men such as manscara and guyliner on the market but obviously men who do use them are a minority and therefore are not goaded to do so by society. In fact, we are seeing the need for make-up backwards and inside out. Why should women (and men) wear make-up at all? It is fitting to call one such make-up product ‘concealer’ because it does just that; conceals real beauty. Beauty is down to the imperfections that we all have. Just like the flaws within a snowflake makes it beautiful, the uniqueness of our bodies is what truly makes us attractive.

My good friend Bry once told me that the key to make-up is to wear it without anyone knowing so obviously some feel that make-up gives them confidence or makes them feel good which is a valid point however we must remember that true beauty lies underneath. We shouldn’t rely entirely on cosmetics to define who we are. If we create a society that puts more importance on façades created by the application of foundation and lip gloss where would that leave us? Who would be running our country? (Null and void question – all politicians rely on façades). The truth is we must be sure not to objectify ourselves just to feel normal because as much as we all deny it to each other none of us are in fact normal.

It is time we stop forcing our ideals of beauty on each other, cliché as it may sound, we should be accepting everyone as they are; be it in what they wear, their sexuality or, indeed, what they look like without make-up. It should be up to all of us to decide what empowers us, not those around us. After all pretty is as pretty does.

Movie Review: ‘Pride

8/10

Pride is a British ‘dramedy’ written by Stephen Beresford and directed by Matthew Warchus. It depicts the true story of a group of lesbian and gay activists from London calling themselves L.G.S.M (Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners) who helped raise money for the families affected by the miners’ strike in 1984 during the reign of Thatcher’s government. Due to the National Union of Mineworkers’ worry of being associated with homosexuality L.G.S.M decide to go straight to the source and offer their donations to a random mining village in Wales; the Dulais Valley. With no idea how the locals will react in such a small, isolated village, L.G.S.M are invited to its town hall which results in an unlikely alliance between two oppressed groups during Thatcher’s time in power.

In honesty, I was hesitant to watch the socio-political and historical feel good film due to the fact that a number of similar films share a depressing tone focussing heavily on the negative circumstances surrounding homosexuality such as the homophobic brutality that took place in the streets. However, I was glad and very relieved to discover that Pride concentrates largely on the positivity of how two minorities can work together to attempt to oppose the government’s regressive actions. Although, it did contain some emotional scenes which aided in presenting the spectrum of public opinion at the time, it did so without losing its uplifting vibe. Similar to many of its peers though, the film is based on a part of history that very few people are aware of to do with the mining strikes of 1984 (my parents are both Welsh and come from the same area and had no idea about L.G.S.M’s influence on the area). However, what makes Pride such a must-see film is that it does not simply stop at informing the public of a group of forgotten heroes but attempts to change the public perception that is held over a very dark decade of British history as well.

I must make clear that the film is not only for homosexuals (or the Welsh); it is a film that can be enjoyed by straight people as well. It delves deeper than merely a movie about homosexuality; it explores several themes such as acceptance, community and struggle. Obviously it is these three themes give the L.G.S.M and the small Welsh village its similarities which help them accept each other.

With a plethora of celebrity actors merging with a number of lesser known actors such as Bill Nighy and Andrew Scott, Pride is not entirely a roar with laughter film but the audience will find themselves beaming from ear to ear throughout with, as the name suggests, pride.

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